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Screening

Introduction

Brief interventions are “practices that aim to investigate a potential problem and motivate an individual to begin to do something about his/her substance abuse, either by natural, client-directed means or by seeking additional substance abuse treatment. A brief intervention is not a substitute for individuals with alcohol or drug addiction but can be used to engage clients to seek further help.

Source: Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 34. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). DHHS Publication 99-3353.

RESOURCES

I. PRINTED RESOURCES

Assessing Alcohol Problems: A Guide for Clinicians and Researchers (1997) assists the clinician in locating, examining, and selecting instruments appropriate for use in all stages in the assessment process. John P. Allen, NIAAA Treatment Handbook Series 4, US Department of Health and Human Services.

Assessment of Addictive Behaviors (2nd ed.) (2005) includes assessment of specific behaviors, evaluating coping skills, readiness to change, and risk factors for relapse. Dennis M. Donovan, G. Alan Marlatt.

Assessment and Treatment of Patients with Coexisting Mental Illness and Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (1996) consists of recommendations for the assessment and treatment of patients with dual disorders. Richard Ries, Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 9, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

Clinical Work with Substance Abusing Clients (2006) covering how to assess and treat clients with drug and alcohol problems and how to work with their families. Presenting approaches that have been shown to be effective, this uniquely practical resource includes models for replication in a variety of clinical settings. Shulamith Lala Ashenberg Straussner.

Drug and Alcohol Abuse: A Clinical Guide to Diagnosis and Treatment (2000) is written to serve the needs of clinicians handling emergency problems.  Marc Alan Schuckit.

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II. ONLINE RESOURCES

SCREENING

Websites Specific to Screening

Screening for Mental Health

Screening Works: Update from the Field (March/April 2008) introduces the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Initiative which is designed for medical practice in clinics, emergency rooms, and other treatment settings. SAMHSA News, Volume 16, Number 2.

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Online Resources – Screening

Screening is typically to determine addiction severity or presence of disease, particularly communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C, tuberculosis, etc.

Alcohol Clinical Training Project was established to disseminate the latest research on alcohol and teach pragmatic clinical skills to screen and conduct brief intervention for alcohol problems. BostonMedicalCenter and BostonUniversitySchools of Medicine and Public Health.

Alcohol and Other Drug Screening of Hospitalized Trauma Patients Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 16. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). DHHS Publication 95-3039.

Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention (SBI) for Trauma Patients: COT Quick Guide American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma, US Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Transportation.

Alcohol Use Among Older Adults Pocket Screening Instruments (2001) contains facts about the use of alcohol by older adults for use by health service professionals. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) DHHS Publication No. 02-3621.

Helping Patients Who Drink Too Much. A Clinician’s Guide (2005) is written for primary care and mental health clinicians. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). NIH Publication 07-3769.

Simple Screening Instruments for Outreach for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Infectious Diseases (1995) recognizes that simple instruments are needed to screen for alcohol and other drug abuse problems and infectious diseases.  Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 11. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). DHHS Publication No. 95-3058.

Screening for Infectious Diseases Among Substance Abusers (1995) focuses on infectious diseases that are prevalent in and especially harmful to patients in drug treatment, and that can be medically managed by treatment staff or through referrals for primary care. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 6. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). DHHS Publication No. 95-3060.

See the Brief Intervention section below for more resources.

ASSESSMENT

Websites with Assessment Instruments

Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions

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Online Resources – Assessment

Addiction psychologists can lower barriers to getting help for alcohol and drug problems (2002) explains how assessment can be one step in getting the addicted individual the help he/she needs. Arnold M. Washton.

The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test: Guidelines for Use in Primary Care, Second Edition  (2001) is an assessment instrument for primary care workers. Use in conjunction with the brief intervention manual Brief Intervention for Hazardous and Harmful Drinking. World Health Organization, Department of Mental Health and Substance Dependence.

A review of addictions-related screening and assessment instruments: Measuring the instruments (January 2009) summarizes two reviews commissioned by AADAC for screening and assessment instruments currently available for use in addictions counselling. Alberta Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission (AADAC). ISBN 0-7785-3256-9.

Online Resources – Assessment Instruments and Motivational Interviewing

Motivational Interviewing Instruments

For more information on Motivational Interviewing see the Psychological Modalities section.

Online Resources – Assessment Instruments and 12-Step Participation

12-Step Assessment Instruments

For more information on the 12 Steps see the 12 Step Support Groups section.

Online Resources – Assessment Instruments and Addiction Research

Assessment to Aid in the Treatment Planning Process (August 2004) reviews a number of instruments that are available to assist the clinician and clinical researcher in the personal assessment stage and in the development of appropriate treatment plans. Dennis Donovan. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).

Assessment of Alcohol Problems: An Overview (August 2004) is designed to enrich the contribution of assessment to alcoholism treatment both by apprising clinicians of the wide array of instruments available and by assisting them to make well-informed decisions about which instruments are most helpful for serving their clients. John P. Allen. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).

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BRIEF INTERVENTION

Online Resources – Brief Intervention

Brief Interventions and Brief Therapies for Substance Abuse Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 34. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). DHHS Publication 99-3353.

Brief Intervention for Hazardous and Harmful Drinking: A Manual for Use in Primary Care (2001) is designed to help primary care workers – physicians, nurses, community health workers, and others – to deal with hazardous drinking. Use in conjunction with the assessment manual The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. World Health Organization, Department of Mental Health and Substance Dependence.

Guide to Substance Abuse Services for Primary Care Clinicians (1997)
Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 24. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). DHHS Publication 97-3139.

Screening and Brief Intervention for Unhealthy Alcohol Use in the Emergency Department is designed to provide the emergency department (ED) practitioner with the necessary skills to easily perform a brief intervention with ED patients who have been identified as harmful or hazardous alcohol drinkers. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).

See Screening section above for more resources.

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